[Masthead] Fair ~ 63°F  
High: 88°F ~ Low: 60°F
Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014

Schmidt Sting Pain Index: OUCH !

Posted Tuesday, July 1, 2008, at 11:40 AM

While investigating a friend's outbreak of flying ants at his home and assuring him that they were not termites, I ran across this interesting bit of insect trivia: The Schmidt Sting Pain Index. It seems that Justin O. Schmidt, an entomologist at the Carl Hayden Bee Research Center, developed it a few years back in an attempt to rate insect stings, the same way we have a scale to rate tornadoes (Fugita scale), hurricanes (Safford-Simpson scale), earthquakes (Richter scale), hot peppers (Scoville units) and so on.

The following are just a few of his rather humorous descriptions of the stings:

1.0 Sweat bee: Light, ephemeral, almost fruity. A tiny spark has singed a single hair on your arm.

1.2 Fire ant: Sharp, sudden, mildly alarming. Like walking across a shag carpet & reaching for the light switch.

1.8 Bullhorn acacia ant: A rare, piercing, elevated sort of pain. Someone has fired a staple into your cheek.

2.0 Bald-faced hornet: Rich, hearty, slightly crunchy. Similar to getting your hand mashed in a revolving door.

2.0 Yellowjacket: Hot and smoky, almost irreverent. Imagine W. C. Fields extinguishing a cigar on your tongue.

2.5 Honey bee and European hornet: Like a matchhead that flips off and burns on your skin.

3.0 Red harvester ant: Bold and unrelenting. Somebody is using a drill to excavate your ingrown toenail.

3.0 Paper wasp: Caustic & burning. Distinctly bitter aftertaste. Like spilling a beaker of hydrochloric acid on a paper cut.

4.0 Tarantula hawk: Blinding, fierce, shockingly electric. A running hair drier has been dropped into your bubble bath.

4.0+ Bullet ant: Pure, intense, brilliant pain. Like fire-walking over flaming charcoal with a 3-inch rusty nail in your heel.

Now, don't you agree that his descriptive terminology is superb. And who hasn't experienced all of those painful experiences at least once in their life? Well, I must admit on that last one, fire walking with a rusty nail in one's foot, I've never personally tried to do those two at the same time, just on separate occasions.


Comments
Showing most recent comments first
[Show in chronological order instead]

Did ya ever notice when it is going to rain--the red wasps get very aggitated and seem to want to sting somebody, anybody, everybody--- just sting sting sting!

-- Posted by Glenda on Thu, Jul 24, 2008, at 11:41 PM

Below is a preview of your comment. If you are satisfied, press the Save button at the bottom to finish posting your comment. If you wish to correct something, use your browser's Back button to return to the previous page.

With the beginning of summer comes the blooming of trees, gardens and flowers, which in turn attracts bees and wasps of all kinds. But that is not the end of the worry of a sting. Many stings take place during the fall months. Reason being, bees and wasps are cold blooded insects and they linger around people in order to absorb the body heat of humans, therefore increasing the chances of getting stung.

Last week, I witnessed a 4 year old girl with her hand and forearm swollen to her elbow, from a wasp sting that she received to her fingertip the day before. The sight of her hand and arm brought tears to my eyes because I knew that if she had had Baker's Venom Cleanser available when see was stung, none of her discomfort would have elevated to that extreme point of swelling and discomfort.

Our web site http://www.BeeStingCure.com has under gone some new additions worth taking a look at. Old news commentary video footage from 1988 has been added to http://www.YouTube.com/BeeStingCure and the link is available at our site.

-- Posted by BradBkr on Wed, Jul 2, 2008, at 4:23 PM

With the beginning of summer comes the blooming of trees, gardens and flowers, which in turn attracts bees and wasps of all kinds. But that is not the end of the worry of a sting. Many stings take place during the fall months. Reason being, bees and wasps are cold blooded insects and they linger around people in order to absorb the body heat of humans, therefore increasing the chances of getting stung.

Last week, I witnessed a 4 year old girl with her hand and forearm swollen to her elbow, from a wasp sting that she received to her fingertip the day before. The sight of her hand and arm brought tears to my eyes because I knew that if she had had Baker's Venom Cleanser available when see was stung, none of her discomfort would have elevated to that extreme point of swelling and discomfort.

Our web site http://www.BeeStingCure.com has under gone some new additions worth taking a look at. Old news commentary video footage from 1988 has been added to http://www.YouTube.com/BeeStingCure and the link is available at our site.

-- Posted by BradBkr on Wed, Jul 2, 2008, at 4:21 PM

A big red wasp sting to me is devastating........ like H2SO4 on a strawberry gotten from sliding into second base.........................

-- Posted by Johnny Yuma on Tue, Jul 1, 2008, at 10:16 PM


Respond to this blog

Posting a comment requires free registration. If you already have an account, enter your username and password below. Otherwise, click here to register.

Username:

Password:  (Forgot your password?)

Your comments:
Please be respectful of others and try to stay on topic.


Honey Bees and Cell Phones
Kenneth Jones
Recent posts
Archives
Blog RSS feed [Feed icon]
Comments RSS feed [Feed icon]
Login
Hot topics
Overpopulation and Electric Cars
(28 ~ 10:51 AM, Feb 14)

EVILUTION
(52 ~ 8:33 PM, Aug 15)

A New Element Added to the Periodic Table
(12 ~ 8:50 PM, Nov 5)

The Sky is falling
(5 ~ 2:50 AM, Oct 7)

CRY WOLF NOT BIGFOOT !
(3 ~ 8:57 PM, Aug 23)