Lowery receives American Towman Medal for heroism

Sunday, January 7, 2018
David Lowery (middle) of Lowery’s Wrecker Service of Dyersburg recently received the American Towman Medal for heroism after putting his life at risk, while on duty, to save the life of another human being. Lowery was presented his award during the American Towman Magazine’s Festival Night in Baltimore, Maryland on Nov. 18, 2017. Pictured with Lowery at the ceremony are American Towman Operations Editor Randall Resch and American Towman Managing Editor Brendan Dooley.

BRANDON HUTCHESON

bhutcheson@stategazette.com

David Lowery, of Lowery’s Wrecker Service from Dyersburg, recently received the American Towman Medal for putting his life at risk, while on duty, in an endeavor to save the life of another human being. The medal recognizes the risks that all towing professionals face and honors those who place their life on the line to save another human life. The Towman Medal is the industry’s highest honor, and the medal inscription reads ‘For The Simple Act of Bravery’.

Lowery was presented the medal by American Towman Magazine during Festival Night of the annual American Towman Exposition, held on November 18, 2017 at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland. The American Towman Exposition is the world’s largest trade show and convention for emergency road service providers. Since the first Festival Night in 1989, the awarding of the American Towman Medal has been a treasured event for the towing and recovery industry.

Lowery was awarded for his effort during an accident that occurred in July 2017.

According to a release from American Towman, on July 19, 2017, on Interstate 155, a semitrailer crashed with a mowing tractor whose operator was unresponsive. The semi was on its side, over and embankment, with the driver pinned inside. In addition, the vehicle was unsteady as well. Within minutes of his arrival, Tennessee Highway Patrol troopers stated that Lowery was able to secure the tractor-trailer for a rescue of the driver to begin. Lowery also climbed into the cab and freed the driver’s legs from under the dash and steering wheel. The truck driver was then airlifted to the hospital.

“I truly believe that with the speed of his arrival time and knowledge of his wrecker, Mr. Lowery saved this man’s life,” stated THP Sgt. William Butler III in the release.

“It’s an honor to be recognized,” said Lowery. I was just concentrating on getting that man out of there.”

The exposition also honored the Spirit Ride, which passed through Dyersburg in August 2017, promoting the Move Over Law. The law requires motorists to move over and change lanes to give safe clearance to law enforcement officers, firefighters, ambulances, and tow truck operators.

In Tennessee, the law passed in 2006 and expanded to include utility service equipment in 2011 to the list of vehicles, for which motorists are required to either slow down or move over. The penalty for violating the Move Over Law in Tennessee is a maximum fine up to $500 and possibly up to 30 days in jail.

Noting that safety is a key component to the job, Lowery added, “All first responders be careful – keep your head on a swivel. That’s my motto. Just be careful out there.”

He also asked motorists to please abide by the Move Over Law.

Lowery is a fourth-generation tower, and Lowery’s Wrecker Service has been in operation in Dyer County since 1957.

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  • Congratulations, such an honor and well deserved!

    -- Posted by J. Markham on Sun, Jan 7, 2018, at 9:19 AM
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